SAT AND ACT IMPROVEMENT: REALITIES

Published on 20 December 2013 in Business
Dr. Wayne Adams (author)

Dr. Wayne Adams


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By Dr. Wayne Adams, Former Dean and Full Professor of a Graduate School of Business

Dr. Wayne Adams has degrees and advanced studies from Harvard, Yale, and Vanderbilt. He is one of the leading tutors in the country.

About now, parents throughout Florida are waking up to some hard realities about the SAT and ACT Examinations. As correctly predicted in the Tampa Bay Times article last April, the dramatic increases in the minimum qualifying SAT and ACT scores for these scholarships are eliminating 50% - 75% of students for 2014 who would have been eligible if they had graduated in 2013.

Most of the damage has been done in the Florida Medallion Scholars level, where the minimum eligibility thresholds have been increased on the SAT from 1070 to 1170, and on the ACT from 22 to 26. The new requirements for the Florida Medallion Scholars on the SAT increased from 1270 to 1280, and on the ACT from 28 to 29.

For the past three years, the reality is that Florida students have continually ranked around 45th in the key category of student performance on the SAT and ACT compared to other states. Our school programs are clearly not working to improve scores against this national standard, which cannot be influenced by local or state politics. Yet these scores continue to be vital for college admissions and scholarships.

The positive reality is that our students can dramatically improve their SAT and ACT scores with focused, concentrated help. Improvement is like helping a student climb as high as possible on the part of their educational iceburg that towers out of the water. Learning strategies, specific test taking techniques, and working with my proprietary study guides consistently help students climb as high as they can. I cannot help broaden or deepen their academic foundation which it the eightninths under water. But I do help them do their best with where they are.

My students normally improve 200 – 300 points on their combined SAT scores, and 4 – 7 points on their ACT composite scores. When any parent looks at the “before and after” essays, they are amazed. These students have been admitted to Harvard, Yale, Columbia, Cornell, University of Chicago, Boston College, USC, UCLA, LSU, Berkley School of Music, UF, USF, UCF, Stetson, U Miami, New College of Florida, and many other outstanding colleges and universities. Many have received academic, athletic, and music scholarships.

For seniors, increasing your score for Bright Futures and getting across the threshhold of SAT or ACT levels for your desired college can still be accomplished. For Juniors and Sophomores, there is no better time to start preparing because practice and knowing what to do can greatly improve your scores, plus you can “cherry pick” your best score from different examinations, submit them, and colleges do not know they came from multiple examinations. Since these exams are graded on a curve, often students can score higher in the Winter and Spring when the number and quality of those taking the exams are lower.

If you would like to talk more about how I can help your student, please contact me at 727- 253-0639 or wwa0811@gmail.com. Classes are available in December, January, February, and during the holidays.

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